COVID-19 Vaccine Bulletin: #4 Can I trust the ingredients used in the COVID-19 vaccines?

#4 CAN I TRUST THE INGREDIENTS USED IN THE COVID-19 VACCINES?

There have been many claims around the ingredients of the COVID-19 vaccines so we fully appreciate colleagues will have concerns.

The ingredients are readily available for anyone to view online so they can find out more about them:

Pfizer/Biontech: www.gov.uk/government/publications/regulatory-approval-of-pfizer-biontech-vaccine-for-covid-19/information-for-uk-recipients-on-pfizerbiontech-covid-19-vaccine

AstraZeneca: www.gov.uk/government/publications/regulatory-approval-of-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca/information-for-uk-recipients-on-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca

Moderna: www.gov.uk/government/publications/regulatory-approval-of-covid-19-vaccine-moderna/information-for-uk-recipients-on-covid-19-vaccine-moderna

Please read on as Claire Leake, People Director, tries to explain some of the rumours circulating about the ingredients inside the vaccines and why you shouldn’t be concerned about having it.

MYYH: The COVID-19 vaccines have ingredients which are unsuitable for religious groups

Claims that the vaccine contains gelatine have caused concern in religious communities. However, vaccine manufacturers have said the vaccine does not contain any animal ingredients and no animal-derived cells were used.

The British Islamic Medical Association has recommended at-risk individuals within the Muslim community get vaccinated, and the Mosque and Imams National Advisory Board is running a campaign to encourage Muslim communities to get vaccinated.

MYTH: The vaccines have ingredients that are unsuitable for vegans

The MHRA have confirmed the COVID-19 vaccines do not contain any components of animal origin including porcine products or egg.

This guide contains information on how vaccines are made and what human and animal products are used: www.gov.uk/government/publications/use-of-human-and-animal-products-in-vaccines

MYTH: The vaccines have ingredients which are unsuitable for people with allergies

The NHS report that serious allergic reactions to having the virus are very rare. If you do have a reaction to the vaccine it usually happens within minutes of being injected. The medical staff giving the vaccine are trained in how to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

You should of course tell the healthcare professionals administering the vaccine before you are vaccinated if you have ever had a serious allergic reaction to medicine of any kind.

You should only NOT have the vaccine if you have ever had a serious allergic reaction (including anaphylaxis) to a previous dose of the same vaccine or any of the ingredients in the vaccine.

If you would like to speak, in confidence, with someone about any of the above concerns or any other related to having the vaccine, please email covid.advice@nationalcaregroup.com